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A little goes a long way with millennials

Millennials by definition are born in the 1980s and ‘90s and have now surpassed the baby boomers as the largest generation. So as they continue to grow up (age), what exactly do cosmetic surgeons need to know to welcome and retain them as patients in their practice?

According to Chicago-based dermatologist Rachel Pritzker, M.D., millennials can be described as technology focused. They create networks through technology and represent themselves from a very young age with their online presence. Dr. Pritzker presented on the topic of millennials and initiating treatment with these younger patients yesterday during the Vegas Cosmetic Surgery and Aesthetic Dermatology 2016 meeting in Las Vegas.

“They are motivated by trends that they see online, and they are always up to date with their knowledge about potential procedures,” Dr. Pritzker tells Cosmetic Surgery Times. “Because of this knowledge, this generation comes into the office at an earlier age requesting treatments — either to make themselves look better in ‘selfies,’ to change an aspect of their appearance they do not like or to prevent the aging process.”

A word to the wise cosmetic surgeon regarding the successful treatment of millennial patients: A little goes a long way, according to Dr. Pritzker.

“Having this generation of consumers is beneficial, as they will be loyal and return frequently, but it is important to sense why they are seeking procedures and not treat a patient with a body dysmorphic syndrome at an early age,” she says. “Top three words of wisdom: marketing, creativity, caution.”

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