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Huge increase in demand projected for cosmetic-surgery-related materials

Cleveland — According to a study conducted by Cleveland-based market-research firm The Freedonia Group, demand for materials and equipment used in cosmetic-surgery procedures will increase 9 percent per year, to $2.4 billion, through 2010.

Cosmetic procedures are forecast to grow 9.1 percent per year to 17.5 million in 2010, generating some $17.3 billion in revenue. Due to patient preferences for less invasive treatments, nonsurgical procedures—injections, dermal resurfacing, microdermabrasion and so forth—are expected to register the lion’s share of that growth. However, says the study, demand for surgical products will continue to be strong in areas such as implants, where there are no significant alternatives as yet.

The study says that gains will be driven by an increasing societal acceptance of plastic surgery, positive clinical evaluations affirming the safety of implants, and a growing desire to enhance personal appearance to improve self-esteem. Breast implants will achieve more rapid gains than other implants, due in part to the expected return to the U.S. market of silicone-gel-filled implants.

Spurred by the introduction of new products—most notably tissue fillers based on synthetic polymers—injectables will register the fastest growth, with sales to increase more than 15 percent annually through 2010, the study projects.

In 2005, equipment accounted for 38 percent of total cosmetic surgery product demand. Future demand, says the survey, will be driven by microdermabrasion machines and a variety of other new equipment types, as well as continued growth in the laser market. Demand for implants is forecast to rise 7.4 percent per year through 2010.

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